A journey through the land of Prosecco: Conegliano Valdobbiadene

Vineyard in the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area - photo by Francesco Galifi

Vineyard in the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area - photo by Francesco Galifi

It might be a difficult name to pronounce, but it is one to be remembered for its famous product of the highest quality, as well as its idyllic landscape and charming hamlets. Conegliano Valdobbiadene is a small hilly area between Venice and the Dolomites in Veneto, home to the Prosecco Superiore since 1876.

Prosecco is a dry white wine made from the grape of the same name. This type of wine produced in Conegliano Valdobbiadene is also known as Prosecco Superiore. Since April 2010, it has become part of Italy’s premium wine category with the DOCG quality label, in an effort to safeguard and celebrate this precious treasure created by man and nature.

Conegliano Valdobbiadene’s Prosecco Superiore is the product of a particular terroir, a mild climate and the skills of men who have passed down the art of their handcrafted labor throughout generations. The area is adorned by vineyards that gently descend on the steep slopes of the hills, and has been nominated to become a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Meschio River in Serravalle, Conegliano - image from "Visit Conegliano Valdobbiadene" booklet

Meschio River in Serravalle, Conegliano - image from "Visit Conegliano Valdobbiadene" booklet

A unique itinerary between wine, tradition and landscapes

To understand the wine history of this land, you must pay a visit to the School of Wine, which is one of just eleven institutes that study oenology in Italy. In fact, the long wine-making tradition of Conegliano Valdobbiadene begun in 1876 with the foundation of Italy’s oldest and most prestigious wine school – the School of Oenology in the town of Conegliano. The area is also home to the Experimental Viticulture Institute, where several Italian grape varieties have been bred and even saved from extinction.

Prosecco Wine Zone map, from italiaoutdoors.com

Prosecco Wine Zone map, from italiaoutdoors.com

Next, it is time to explore the taste and looks of Conegliano Valdobbiadene, and the best way to do that is to enjoy prosecco tasting in the 15 towns that compose the DOCG district: Conegliano, Susegana, San Vendemiano, Colle Umberto, Vittorio Veneto, Tarzo, Cison di Valmarino, Follina, Miane, San Pietro di Feletto, Refrontolo, Pieve di Soligo, Farra di Soligo, Vidor e Valdobbiadene. Uniting these villages is the Road for Prosecco and the Wines of Conegliano Valdobbiadene Hills.

Imagine yourself tasting Prosecco Superiore as well as other local products, such as roasted ‘marroni’ chestnuts (IGP label) or the ‘formajo inbriago’ (translated as drunk cheese) that matures in the grape pomace from Prosecco or from other local red and white wines. The location for such tastings? Lovely bars in the historic city squares or alleys to interact with the locals, but also prestigious and mesmerizing locations, such as in Villa dei Cedri. This neo-classical style mansion was built in 1890 in Valdobbiadene, and is surrounded by a large park with many Lebanese cedars.

Prosecco tasting at Castello di San Salvatore - image by Roberta De Min

Prosecco tasting at Castello di San Salvatore - image by Roberta De Min

The area is also dotted by majestic castles, such as the 14th-century Castle of San Salvatore in Susegana. It is owned by the Counts of Collalto and is considered to be one of the largest fortified hamlets in Italy. Every year it hosts “Vino in Villa”, one of the most important events in the local wine tourism calendar. Another beautiful landmark is the medieval castle of Conegliano: from its terrace located on the tower, the views are simply awe-inspiring, spanning across the vineyards of San Pietro di Feletto, the hills of the Veneto Prealps and – on a clear day – even Venice’s Lagoon!

To witness some locals in action reenacting the history of their territory, in September you can head to the castle of Vidor, where the surrounding villages compete in the Palio. This event commemorates the historic assault of the barbarians on the castle that took place around 1200. During this spectacular competition, participants must carry a wooden ladder from the St. Bona Abbazia to the slopes of the hill on which the castle sits, and then from here they continue carrying a heavy battering ram to the summit.

There are a number of other events in the Conegliano Valdobbiadene area, usually involving historic aspects or wine & food. For example, every June local people dressed up in Renaissance costumes take part of a checkers game called Dama Castellana (Conegliano). In September, instead, different corners around town become the protagonists of Enodama, a checkers tournament during which white and red wine glasses are used instead of pawns!

Dama Castellana living checkers match - image by Associazione Dama Castellana

Dama Castellana living checkers match - image by Associazione Dama Castellana

While the area is mostly known for Prosecco Superiore, it also produces many other types of delicious, quality wines. The Colli di Conegliano (DOCG) are white and red wines created by blending the most noble grape varieties of the Conegliano Hills. The sweetish Refrontolo Passito (DOCG) was lauded by Mozart in his masterpiece “Don Giovanni”. The Torchiato di Fregona (DOCG) is a so-called ‘meditation wine’ for its rich and warming flavor. And finally, the Verdiso (IGT) is created with a centuries-old grape variety, indigenous to the Alta Marca Trevigiana, with limited production.

The magical area of Conegliano Valdobbiadene is ideal for foodie trips, for corporate retreats and team building activities, and for fairytale weddings surrounded by vineyards. Let us make your Italian special event a walk in the park. Contact Italian Special Occasions now!

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A different side of Venice: painting, music and gondola makers

Venice, Italy

Imagine yourself wandering in Venice with your family or friends: the elegant buildings reflect in the water, posters around the lagoon city promote cultural events and theater shows, the gondola boats peacefully float by the canals. You have a unique opportunity to appreciate the beauty of the city, and to discover its secrets, its essence and its tradition through authentic lenses – and not like a mass tourist. How? Here are some ‘treasure trove’ ideas by Italian Special Occasions, whose aim is to discover the real soul of the most famous cities, creating unforgettable memories through the historic and hidden gems that are often shamefully forgotten.

Art: colors & shapes

When you stroll through Venice, you might notice that it has a very particular architecture. Thanks to its strategic position, the city was part of an important trading route with other major centers of the past: Byzantine Constantinople and Islamic Cairo. The result is that Venice’s architectural style is a fusion of both Byzantine and Islamic forms overlaying a Latin Christian foundation.

The first signs of Venetian figurative art can be seen in the Cathedral of Torcello, Santa Maria Assunta, where the mosaics in the chapel’s vault are dated back to the 9th century. Between the 10th and 12th century, the Byzantine and the Christian traditions influenced Venetian art, as you can admire in the decorations of St Mark's Basilica (Byzantine) and the Mosaic of The Last Judgment in the Cathedral of Torcello (Christian).

Trittico dei Frari by Giovanni Bellini

Trittico dei Frari by Giovanni Bellini

Even painters produced works of art that distinguished themselves for merging traditions and cultures. The first truly Venetian artist who made a name for himself was Paolo Veneziano, mixing Gothic, Byzantine and modern elegant styles (early 1300s). Later, the Venetian school was characterized by a great fantasy in decoration with brilliant golds and bright colors. It gained importance with great international artists who lived in Venice, such as Gentile da Fabriano, Michelino da Besozzo and Antonio Pisanello.

Giovanni Bellini is hailed as the "Patriarch" of Venetian painting. His masterpieces can be found in the Churches of Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, San Giobbe, San Zaccaria and San Giovanni Crisostomo. His brother, Gentile Bellini, was sent to Istanbul by the Serenissima Republic in response to the request made by Sultan Mohammed II to have a great portrait painter: his portrait now hangs in London’s National Gallery! Tiepolo was the most important Venetian painter in the 18th century, which was also the age of local landscape artists such as Canaletto, Marieschi and Bellotto, among others.

Music, the voice of the soul

Something not many tourists know is that Venice has played an important role in the development of music in Italy, to the point that the medieval Maritime Republic of Venice was often popularly called the "Republic of Music".

During the 16th century, Venice became one of the most important musical centers of Europe, marked by the Venetian school and it characteristic style of composition, as well as the development of the Venetian “polychoral” style under composers such as Flemish Adrian Willaert.

By the end of the 1500s, the splendor of Venice’s music was renowned all across Europe. An example of this ‘colossal style music’ is the music arranged by composers Andrea and Giovanni Gabrieli, who used multiple choruses and instrumental groups.

During the Baroque period, Venice was also home to many famous composers such as Antonio Vivaldi, Ippolito Ciera, Giovanni Picchi and Girolamo Dalla Casa. They had a fundamental impact in the development of Opera in Venice and the opening of many historic theaters, such as Teatro Tron (the first opera house ever opened to the public), Teatro di SS. Giovanni e Paolo and Teatro San Moisè.

Music is a very particular aspect of Venice’s history that is definitely worth exploring when visiting the lagoon town. A special musical itinerary designed by Italian Special Occasions is guaranteed to give you goose bumps and to fill your soul with emotions through the following experiences and visits:

  • Museum of Music, located in San Maurizio Church, featuring a splendid collection of musical instruments and handmade violin masterpieces from the 18th century
  • Confraternity of Saint Rocco, a famous building featuring the work of Tintoretto
  • Peggy Guggenheim Collection, the most important museum in Italy for 20th-century European and American art
  • the sixteen churches of the Chorus, which house the largest collection of sacred masterpieces by Tiepolo, Veronese, and Tiziano
  • Fondazione Querini Stampalia, a noble Venetian residence where ancient and contemporary meet)
  • the concert season of the Interpreti Veneziani, internationally-acclaimed artists who bring the art of Vivaldi to life.

Uncovering the secrets of the gondola

Have you ever wondered how Venice’s traditional rowing boat is created? And what is the history behind it? This iconic means of transport is handmade by experts in the squero, which is a boatyard where gondole are created and repaired. (Just one quick note: gondola is singular, while gondole is plural… The term ‘gondolas’ does not exist in Italian). Few of such places still exist, but it is possible to visit them, including the most famous one – Squero di San Trovaso, established in the 1600s. The squero also produces other types of boats that are part of the Venetian lagoon tradition and are less known to tourists, such as pupparini, sandoli and sciopòni.

The earliest recorded use of gondole in Venice dates back to the 11th century. In the past, they were colored in different ways, until a law from the 16th century forced the boats to be painted black, in an effort to stop a competition for the most flamboyant colours and ornamentation among the nobility. 

Even though gondole are made by hand, they are highly uniform: they all weigh 700kg, have 280 component pieces and use eight types of wood – oak, elm, lime, larch, fir, cherry, walnut and mahogany. While squeraroli and carpenters are in charge of building the main structure of the boat, artisans create other parts in workshops and laboratories. For example, the specialist remeri create the oars and the forcola (the typical Venetian rowlock) with great skill and ability.

This animated video by TED-Ed offers an entertaining and colorful insight into the history of the gondola, including how they became the local trademark transportation.

Special events in Venice

Are you planning a special occasion in Venice? Make it unforgettable by offering your wedding guests or corporate clients a trip with authentic activities and a unique way of experiencing local traditions and history…. Have Venetian music artists be part of your event; join an expert artisan in the creation of typical handmade Carnival masks; let us help your imagination in the creation of your dream occasion! Contact Italian Special Occasions now for your customized quotation

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Veneto is more than Venice: a thousand hidden gems

Vicenza's Mountain District, image by Sal Messina

Vicenza's Mountain District, image by Sal Messina

Off to the eastern side of northern Italy, Veneto is not all about Venice and Verona. The town of Vicenza is generally considered the cultural capital of this region, and this is largely because of its extremely rich architectural heritage endowed by 16th-century Andrea Palladio and his fantastic villas, today considered a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

However, the lesser-known area surrounding Vicenza is just as exciting and breathtaking: the mountains offer a ton of activities and attractions that allow visitors to enjoy local culture, history, traditions, nature, sport and enogastronomy. This is a fantastic destination for family and friend reunions in Italy. Here are just some of the off-the-beaten-track attractions offered by the Montagna Vicentina (the mountain district of Vicenza).

Trekking on ciaspole at night, image from gruppociclisticoiseo.blogspot.com

Trekking on ciaspole at night, image from gruppociclisticoiseo.blogspot.com

Snowshoeing under the moonlight

Imagine yourself exploring the Little Dolomites during a moonlit night, calmly trekking through the ethereal landscape by using local ‘ciaspole’ (snowshoes) on the white snow mantle. The experience is unlike any other! You can listen the silence of the woods, appreciate the beauty of the valleys from a different light, wonder at the star-studded sky, warm up with delicious Italian hot chocolate or local liqueurs next to a cozy fireplace in a rifugio (mountain shelter). You can also enjoy tasting sessions of local delicacies, such as vin brulè and gnocchi pasta with fioreta cheese. An excellent network of enchanted trails exists to connect different locations across the Little Dolomites, by night or by day.

What's the history behind the stairway at Calà del Gesso? Image from angolodellamicizia.forumfree.it

What's the history behind the stairway at Calà del Gesso? Image from angolodellamicizia.forumfree.it

Braving the world’s longest flight of steps

Are you up for a tough, but obviously rewarding, challenge? 4,444 steps will take you to the top of Calà del Sasso: this is Italy’s longest stairway, and the longest in the world among those open to the public. The 7-km flight of steps is carved entirely in the rock with an altitude gap of over 700 meters. The route links the town of Valstagna with the community of Sasso di Asiago. This is not only a sportive activity that puts your body to the test, but also an adventure that brings you close to local history and legends. In fact, you will learn about how this stairway was used for centuries by local woodcutters; how Venetians used them from the 15th to the 18th Centuries to supply its ship-building arsenal; and even the story behind the stairs’ alternative name, i.e. the Lovers' Stairway. Along the way, you can also stop at interesting museums such as the Oliero Paper Mill Museum, the Museum of Speleology and the Canal di Brenta Ethnographic Museum.

The game is on! Image from marosticascacchi.it

The game is on! Image from marosticascacchi.it

The weekend of the living chessmen

You can experience a fantasy-like adventure in the Chess Square of Marostica, where over 600 people in period costumes participate in a living Chess Match! This is a traditional celebration of a local legend, according to which two rivals had to play this noble game to decide who would marry Lionora, daughter of the Lord of Marostica. Unfortunately, this event only happens every second weekend of September in even-numbered years. However, whether you are visiting during the occasion or at any other time, you can still visit the Chess Match Costume Museum to discover the origins and the tradition of this unique spectacle.

Ancient machinery at the Museum of Weaving Machines - image from mumatvaldagno.it

Ancient machinery at the Museum of Weaving Machines - image from mumatvaldagno.it

Weaving through the past

Vicenza was at the heart of the textile production for centuries, and still today it is possible to retrace the paths of local industrial progress and innovative manufacturing processes. Wool production flourished in the 14-15th centuries but reached its peak at the end of the 18th century, when the weavers of Valdagno gained the permission to make cloths of the highest quality, called ‘panni alti’. The Museum of the Weaving Machines has been set up in the workshops of Luigi Marzotto’s firm, the only one to survive during the crisis of the Napoleonic era. It is spread over many rooms, each dedicated to different fibres and yarn spinning, and a teaching workshop is available for groups. This is a great way of understanding not only the progress in industrial technology, but also the local social and economic history.

A traditional local recipe: baccala' alla vicentina - image from giallozafferano.it

A traditional local recipe: baccala' alla vicentina - image from giallozafferano.it

A journey of art and tastes

The array of refined 16th-century artworks that dominate the district of Vicenza, starting from the Palladian villas, is reflected is every aspect of culture, including the unique flavors that characterize the local cuisine. You can combine the exploration of art with Vicenza’s enogastronomy, which is part of Italy’s national culinary excellence. The most fun and rewarding way of learning about local food is by joining a cooking course with an experienced chef. Not only will you use quality products that have received the De.Co. label, you will be able to enjoy what your delicious culinary creation for dinner with wine tasting!

Andrea Palladio's "La Rotonda" villa - image by Philip Schäfer

Andrea Palladio's "La Rotonda" villa - image by Philip Schäfer

Italian architecture abroad

We will close the loop by returning to the opening paragraphs, in which we mentioned Andrea Palladio. This Italian architect has had a fundamental impact not only in Italy, but also abroad. In fact, did you know that the United States Congress has adopted a resolution that recognizes him as the "father" of American architecture? If you pay close attention to what you see in and around Vicenza, you will notice that Palladian architecture has always been the distinguishing mark of American high society houses. Examples include the White House, the Rotunda at the University of Virginia, Villa di Monticello and even the house in Gone with the Wind.

Make your next family reunion or friend gathering unforgettable! Combine authentic activities with the exploration of local traditions in fantastic destinations across Italy. Contact us now for ideas and for a customized quotation

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Valle d’Itria: team building in the land of the Trulli

Centuries-old olive groves in the Itria Valley - image from joinitaly.com

Centuries-old olive groves in the Itria Valley - image from joinitaly.com

The Itria Valley is located in Italy’s hill, Apulia. Despite the name, it is not an actual valley but rather an extensive karst depression shaped by gentle ups and downs. The area is not only a feast for the eyes with its beautiful landscape, but also rich of history and local traditions.

Corporate groups traveling here for incentives travel and team building outings are guaranteed to love Valle d’Itria and its colorful, tasty and entertaining activities. Even business meetings themselves cannot be dull or boring if held in a property like Borgo Egnazia, built entirely of tufo, a local type of limestone and cut by the skilled hands of tufo masters. The property, which includes luxurious accommodation, restaurants, a spa and a business center with meeting rooms, is a modern yet authentic representation of farms and rural villages.

Getting to know the area

Before learning about the activities that can be enjoyed in the Itria Valley, let us have a look at the main features and towns of the area.

The typical trulli - image by Marcok

The typical trulli - image by Marcok

The most famous icons are the trulli, ancient and typical Apulian round stone houses with a conical roof. The area is dotted by these characteristic white-and-gray cones, which are in turn immersed in centuries-old olive groves that produce a large amount of olives and quality olive oil. The idyllic landscape is completed by the vineyards that give life to refined white wines like Locorotondo DOC and Martina Franca DOC.

Most trulli are concentrated in the historic center of Alberobello, a World Heritage Site. Among them are a trullo that hosts the Church of San Antonio, and another – called Trullo Sovrano – that is the tallest and features two floors and a museum.

A natural 'Pantheon' effect in Castellana Caves - image from castellanagrotte.it

A natural 'Pantheon' effect in Castellana Caves - image from castellanagrotte.it

One major natural attraction are the Castellana Caves, a remarkable karst cave system. Among the several grottos that form the complex, you will be awe-struck by the main cave named "La Grave" (the abyss), where big sunbeams filter down from an opening in the ceiling and create magical effects on the walls. In the White Cave, you will find very white and translucent stalagmites. Watch out for the Precipice Cavern!

Cisternino is a small town with a charming historic center. Historic palaces here include the baroque Palazzo del Governatore; while the medieval tower of Porta Grande used to be the entrance of the village at the time of the Norman-Svevian rule. Local traditional recipes include orecchiette pasta with beef chop, and "bombette", a type of roasted pork meatball.

Other lovely towns that are worth visiting are Locorotondo, Martina Franca, Noci and Putignano (the latter is particularly famous for hosting Europe’s longest and oldest Carnival).

Activities: artisanship, harvest, sports and ancient crafts

Beautiful small treasures can be created with one’s hands and creativity. Inspired by the trulli of Alberobello, team-building groups can participate in a painting workshop with experienced artisans to learn how to decorate terracotta and wood objects.

Moving towards Martina Franca, the art of leather can be appreciated in small family ateliers. The process behind the creation of purses, document holders, belts and masks with quality Italian leather is fascinating!

Ancient olive oil mill - image by Millenari di Puglia

Ancient olive oil mill - image by Millenari di Puglia

How does the Valle d’Itria produce its quality wines and olive oil? You can be part of an eno-gastronomic journey by actively participating in the harvest of grapes and olives; visiting historic wineries and olive oil mills dating back to the late 1800s; and tasting the local excellences. Groups can also join fun cooking lessons that will put their culinary skills to the test with the preparation of traditional orecchiette and taralli.

To burn up the calories and keep fit, cycling is not only a great teambuilding activity, but also a great eco-friendly way to observe local rural nature and lifestyle by moving around the small villages and olive groves. A driving range and fantastic fairways are available on the 18-hole San Domenica Golf Club for beginners and experienced golfers to practice their swing.

Apulia and the Valle d’Itria offer also an authentic chance to learn about ancient crafts that have survived throughout the centuries. One example is the ‘paretaro’, which corresponds to today’s bricklayer, except that back in the days… walls were created with characteristic local stones! Participants can witness the restoration of dry-stone walls by the hands of experts. Another rare opportunity is that of observing experienced women at work on antique weaving looms. Can a machine from the 1600s still be used to produce lovely scarves, carpets and bags? You bet, watch the video below!


Plan and realize your next corporate meeting and team building outing with Italian Special Occasions. Contact us now for a customized quotation

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The historic and artistic treasures of Friuli Venezia Giulia

The beautiful Piazza Unità in Trieste - image from turismofvg.it

The beautiful Piazza Unità in Trieste - image from turismofvg.it

Friuli Venezia Giulia is a land of frontiers and intersections, of emigrants and immigrants, of a complex history with different ruling powers. The result is a region that has an extremely rich and mixed heritage. In today’s post, we will explore some of its interesting cultural and artistic aspects that showcase the melting pot that Friuli Venezia Giulia really is!

A view of Gorizia - image from turismofvg.it

A view of Gorizia - image from turismofvg.it

Starting with the basics: the name

The region has a long and interesting name that incorporates important parts of its history. Friuli derives from “forum Iulii”, Latin name of the local ancient capital founded by Julius Caesar towards the middle of the Ist century b.C. (today’s town of Cividale). The name “Venezia Giulia” was suggested in the 19th century by Italian linguist Graziadio Ascoli. The name celebrates the local accomplishments of Julius Caesar and Augustus, who both belonged to the Gens Iulia - one of the most ancient patrician families at Rome. But the name also reflects political and geographic controversies of the time, when a narrow strip of land surrounding Trieste was highly disputed between Italy, Austria and Yugoslavia (and is nowadays part of Croatia).

Roman excavations - image from turismofvg.it

Roman excavations - image from turismofvg.it

History in a nutshell

The Romans conquered the area, previously occupied by the Celts, in the III century b.C. The town of Aquileia became one of the most important centers of the Roman Empire, but when the latter started declining, the region was the entry point for the barbaric invasions. Huns, Longobards, Avars, Magyars and the Ottonian dynasty all ruled the area at different times in history, among others. During the Renaissance, the Republic of Venice conquered the area until Napoleon Bonaparte defeated it and handed Friuli to Austria. Finally, with the Third War of Independence, Friuli was annexed to the Kingdom of Italy, except for the province of Gorizia that was added at the end of World War I.

The amazing mosaic in Aquileia's Basilica - image from nikonclubitalia.com

The amazing mosaic in Aquileia's Basilica - image from nikonclubitalia.com

Languages & dialects

The most obvious and immediate result of the processes that spiced up the history of Friuli Venezia Giulia, is the variety of languages that are spoken in this beautiful region. Apart from Italian, which is the official language, the ‘Friulano’ (an ancient Romance language also known as Eastern Ladin) is taught in schools and spoken by 600.000 people – that’s about half of the region’s population. Slovene is spoken in some provinces of Gorizia and Trieste, while German is used in the areas of Val Canale, Sauris and Timau. National law protects all of these languages, while regional law also safeguards local dialects as a traditional heritage. Examples are the Triestine dialect, local versions of the Venetian language, bisiaco, gradese and muggesano.

First World War Open Air Museum - image from turismofvg.it

First World War Open Air Museum - image from turismofvg.it

At a crossroads between peoples

Artistically, Friuli Venezia Giulia offers breathtaking buildings that communicate its history and the culture of the peoples that have inhabited it.  Trieste mixes fine Hapsburg architecture and historical cafes, with a cosmopolitan feel through signs of Catholic, Evangelical, Waldensian, Serbian-orthodox and Jewish religions. Gorizia is known as the ‘garden town’ because of its noble Mittel-European charm. Udine boasts masterpieces by painter Giambattista Tiepolo and streets with Venetian and Art Nouveau style palaces. Cividale del Friuli features Tempietto Longobardo, which represents one of the most mysterious occidental early-medieval architectures; while the Basilica in Aquileia preserves an unbelievable paleo-Christian mosaic floor. The region lived crucial moments of WWI, and many battles can be relived and trenches be explored through open-air museums like Monfalcone's First World War Theme Park, Mount Ermada and Pal Piccolo on the Carnic Alps.

Traditional lifestyles at Eco-Museum I Mistirs - image from ecomuseomistirs.it

Traditional lifestyles at Eco-Museum I Mistirs - image from ecomuseomistirs.it

Ancient traditions through eco-museums

The region of Friuli Venezia Giulia has launched a “form of innovative museums that preserve, interpret and communicate the identity of the local communities. Eco-museums are  places where the population takes care of its heritage giving value to the landscape and to the material and immaterial cultural assets preserved there, protecting the territory.” One of these 4 places is the Mistîrs Eco-Museum (Paularo), which focuses on the safeguard of ancient trades and the rediscovery of forgotten professional figures. Work is seen as the link between the population and its territory. The others are the Eco-museum of Waters of the Gemona area, the Lis Aganis Eco-museum and the Val Resia Eco-museum. This is a fantastic way for visitors to appreciate local traditions and discover hidden gems, both material and cultural.

Would you like to plan a trip that allows you to explore Italy’s ‘melting pots’? Are you of Italian descent and would like to uncover and understand your family roots in Friuli Venezia Giulia or in other regions? Contact Italian Special Occasions now for your customized quotation

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